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        Genre: New Releases

        Title Description Composer Voicing

        Ubi Caritas

        #MM0832

        NOW AVAILABLE

        “Where charity and love are, God is there.” A commemoration of Jesus Christ for Holy Thursday, for me, the Ubi Caritas has a few significant dimensions; the warmth of Christ’s love, the adoration and mystery of the holy spirit, and the idea of an ‘inclusive, universal’ celebration. Accordingly, my Ubi Caritas reflects this through contrasts in harmonic language, at times chromatic or mysterious, at other times diatonic or pentatonic, reflecting Christ’s love, as well as the influence of modal harmony from Eastern Europe and Africa. Similarly, contrasts in rhythm and texture are incorporated. The calm, sparse music which bookends the work is countered with rhythmic, syncopated music in a kind of ritualistic exultation.

        A Celtic Blessing

        #MM3015

        NOW AVAILABLE

        The text, based on a traditional Celtic blessing, reminds us of the companionship of Christ and parallels our life’s journey with his. It is suitable as a doxology in church services, a blessing in Christian weddings, an act of dedication in baptisms and confirmations, a graduation blession or a moment of musical calm within a choral concert. This piece can provide comfort in times of personal stress and reassurance of the chosen journey through life. It ends with a beautiful and expressive setting of Amen, providing a moment of quietly confident affirmation.

        Let Evening Come (Treble)

        #MM3014

        NOW AVAILABLE

        This piece is based on the text of award-winning American poet Jane Kenyon’s poem by the same name, which contemplates the end of the day, and alludes to the parallels in life and death. With a quiet, reflective beginning, listeners are transported to the peaceful countryside in the late afternoon. Voice parts in turn bathe the listener in rays of light as they “shine through the chinks in the barn”. The piece culminates in an affirming declaration – “let evening come, as it will, and don’t be afraid. God does not leave us comfortless.”

        Let Evening Come SATB

        #MM3013

        NOW AVAILABLE

        This piece is based on the text of award-winning American poet Jane Kenyon’s poem by the same name, which contemplates the end of the day, and alludes to the parallels in life and death. With a quiet, reflective beginning, listeners are transported to the peaceful countryside in the late afternoon. Voice parts in turn bathe the listener in rays of light as they “shine through the chinks in the barn”. The piece culminates in an affirming declaration – “let evening come, as it will, and don’t be afraid. God does not leave us comfortless.”

        In Paradisum

        #MM0833

        NOW AVAILABLE

        Something Childish, but Very Natural

        #MM3011

        NOW AVAILABLE

        Written after Perth’s first lockdown due to Covid-19, this simple yet lush setting of Coleridge’s poetry expresses a first glimpse of hope and return to normality. Both an expressive longing and a gentle dreaming to be with someone far away resonates through the harmony and melodic gestures.

        Three Eucharistic Motets

        #MM3022

        NOW AVAILABLE

        These three motets are settings of hymn texts by the influential theologian and writer, Thomas Aquinas. O Salutaris Hostia (O Saving Victim), Panis Angelicus (Bread Of Angels), and Tantum Ergo (Hence So Great A Sacrament) each pertain to the Eucharist – a central aspect of Christianity. The chant melodies of these texts are layered with other material (both derived from the tune, and freely written) in a similar fashion between each piece to create linked, but unique modern textures. Each uses predominately the same pitches, but with different use of modality originating from each chant theme producing different colours in the sound world.

        This set is a part of the Sacre Australis series.

        Listen below for recordings of Three Eucharistic Motets by Joshua Adams

        O Salutaris Hostia:

        Panis Angelicus:

        Tantum Ergo:

        In Flanders Fields

        #MM2108

        Graeme Morton’s piece “In Flanders Fields” is a poignant setting of the poem by John McCrae. The touching piece swells emotionally, with moments of word painting and an overall sense of serenity. A highly recommended addition for memorial events.

        Major John McCrae was a medical officer with the First Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery. In April 1915, he was stationed in the trenches near Ypres, Belgium – an area traditionally called ‘Flanders’. “The day before he wrote his famous poem, one of McCrae’s closest friends was killed in the fighting and buried in a makeshift grave with a simple wooden cross. Wild poppies were already beginning to bloom between the crosses marking the many graves.” A doctor before the war, and unable to help his friend or any of the others who had died, John McCrae gave them a voice through his poem. (Government of Canada).

        John McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields” has since been a reminder of the horrors of war, and is a significant artefact of WWI and Remembrance ceremonies globally.

         

        Arise my love, my fair one

        #MM0831

        NOW AVAILABLE

        “Arise my love, my fair one” was written in 2012 for the service at St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane commemorating the 20th anniversary of the ordination of women to the priesthood in the Anglican Church of Australia. Flowing lines rise gradually towards the “fragrance” to which the text refers later, the blooming and blossoming of spring and the heralding of a new dawn, for the ministry of women and men. The middle section exhorts in dramatic homophony which gradually calms to release “fragrance”, and then repeats the ideas of the opening. The piece dies away, as if lover and beloved were disappearing into a mist (or a cloud of incense!).

         

        Listen to a recording here!

        Sea Fever

        #MM2114

        Winter Stars (SSAA)

        #MM0819

        This piece for choir, piano and flute paints a cloudless winter night – the piano and flute adding a crisp clarity to the atmosphere. A lovely piece for secondary choir, and a great addition to your concert programme.

        Winter Stars (SATB)

        #MM0818

        This piece for choir, piano and flute paints a cloudless winter night – the piano and flute adding a crisp clarity to the atmosphere. A lovely piece for secondary choir, and a great addition to your concert programme.

        We Are The Future (SSAA)

        #MM0817

        This piece is currently in preparation, and will be available shortly. For enquiries, please contact admin@mortonmusic.com

        A wonderfully uplifting piece with solos throughout, We Are The Future is highly recommended for youth choir. With text adapted from year 8, Brighton Secondary Student, Paris Maddern’s poem “The Future”, this joyous piece for SATB or SSA choir carries a strong, youthful voice and sings of their hope for the future, and their role in it.

        “And I cry at the glowing blaze of disaster in this world

        Yearning to reshape it, let goodness be unfurled

        Perhaps I am not good enough

        Perhaps my strength exceeds me,

        The world will see me.”

        We Are The Future (SATB)

        #MM0816

        A wonderfully uplifting piece with solos throughout, We Are The Future is highly recommended for youth choir. With text adapted from year 8, Brighton Secondary Student, Paris Maddern’s poem “The Future”, this joyous piece for SATB or SSA choir carries a strong, youthful voice and sings of their hope for the future, and their role in it.

        “And I cry at the glowing blaze of disaster in this world

        Yearning to reshape it, let goodness be unfurled

        Perhaps I am not good enough

        Perhaps my strength exceeds me,

        The world will see me.”

         

         

        Waltzing Matilda (SATB)

        #MM2116

        A fresh take on an Aussie classic.

        The Road Not Taken (SSAA)

        #MM0815

        This poignant piece, written for the Seymour College Chamber Singers, is based on the poem by the same name by Robert Frost. The text tells of a traveller who comes across a fork in the road and decides to take the road less travelled – a moving reflection on life’s decisions. Composer Carl Crossin’s decision to include violin adds a further element of emotion to an already very stirring piece. Highly recommended.

        The Road Not Taken (SATB)

        #MM0814

        This poignant piece, written for the Seymour College Chamber Singers, is based on the poem by the same name by Robert Frost. The text tells of a traveller who comes across a fork in the road and decides to take the road less travelled – a moving reflection on life’s decisions. Composer Carl Crossin’s decision to include violin adds a further element of emotion to an already very stirring piece. Highly recommended, particularly for youth choirs.

        Rise (SATB)

        #MM0808

        In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Carl Crossin writes that the brief given to him in the commission of this work was that the song be “uplifting and life affirming” – and that it certainly is. A wonderful piece for secondary choir

         

        Rise (SSAA)

        #MM0807

        In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Carl Crossin writes that the brief given to him in the commission of this work was that the song be “uplifting and life affirming” – and that it certainly is. A wonderful piece for secondary choir.

        Part Needle, Part Thread

        #MM0813

        Part Needle, Part Thread was composed in 2020 for the Adelaide Chamber Singers, though due to the COVID-19 pandemic, was unable to be performed at the World Choir Games in Belgium as intended. It was later video recorded by the Adelaide Chamber Choir for online release.

        The text by Ann Nadge explores the delicate connection between love and time, describing that connection as an entity, a process and a protection against emotional darkness. Carl Crossin, effortlessly weaves the voices between each other, painting the metaphor of needle and thread before time seemingly stops in the dramatic B section. Listen below.

        On Giving

        #MM0826

        Mind

        #MM0805

        Mind is an energetic and driven work. The text is a short poem written by Schultz himself that, “celebrates the power and resilience of the human mind with its unstoppable energy and irrepressible desire to create. The poem seemed especially suited to a piece for young voices as each generation brings new imagination and optimism to the endless challenges of life on earth.”

         

        Listen to Mind via YouTube

        Mater Dolorosa

        #MM0812

        NOW AVAILABLE

        The original SATB version of Mater Dolorosa was composed for conductor Jillian McGregor and the Corinthian Singers of Adelaide for a Good Friday concert in the Art Gallery of South Australia’s Radford Auditorium in April, 2011. The work was subsequently revised and expanded (SSATBarB) in 2013, and was premiered by Adelaide Chamber Singers – conducted by Carl Crossin – at the Musica Sacra a Roma in Rome, Italy in July 2013. Mater Dolorosa is a setting of the first four stanzas of the 13th century Marian hymn Stabat Mater Dolorosa, a much longer poem which expresses Mary’s sorrow as she stood at the foot of the cross witnessing her son’s death by crucifixion.

        Everyone Sang (SSAA)

        #MM0810

        A delightful, joyous piece imbued with a sense of wonder throughout, Carl Crossin’s Everyone Sang is a fantastic addition to any concert programme. Incorporating birdsong with piano, cello and voices, this is a wonderfully atmospheric piece, and sure to be a great success. Highly recommended!

        Everyone Sang (SSAATB)

        #MM0809

        A delightful, joyous piece imbued with a sense of wonder throughout, Carl Crossin’s Everyone Sang is a fantastic addition to any concert programme. Incorporating birdsong with piano, cello and voices, this is a wonderfully atmospheric piece, and sure to be a great success. Highly recommended!

        Evening Prayer

        #MM2107

        The text of this piece is taken from the Evening Prayer of St Augustine, which asks for the protection and love of God whilst we are asleep, before calling for a blessing upon those who are suffering. While an a cappella performance is preferred, the minimal accompaniment gives harmonic support and can be used if desired in rehearsal or performance.

        As Wave Drives Wave

        #MM0804

        AS WAVE DRIVES WAVE for choir, opus 115 (2021) by Andrew Schultz is an unaccompanied setting of memorable lines from Ovid’s Metamorphoses which he in turn drew from Pythagoras’ The Eternal Flux. The motion of the waves and their restless renewal is used as a metaphor for the certainty of perpetual change in the universe. The imagery in Ovid’s text is very beautiful and possibly even a little melancholy – or maybe granitic and philosophical and hence, sadness is irrelevant. In this choral setting the text has been adapted and personalised by the composer. This six minute piece is based on slow-moving harmony with sequences of overlapping and interlocking chords – as if unresolved suspensions were waves pushing waves. The work is an eight-part SATB choir setting but a lot of the work is really in four parts with pairs of voices starting in unison and then splitting apart. As wave drives wave was commissioned by the Brisbane Chamber Choir and their Artistic Director, Graeme Morton, and was composed in late 2021. They perform the work here at Christ Church North Adelaide, South Australia as a part of the Adelaide Chamber Singers Festival in October 2023. The video was recorded by Australian Digital Concert Hall. TEXT Since I have embarked on endless sea and set my sails, I now do know this: As wave drives wave, And each, pursued, Pursues the next. For what was before is left behind; And what was not, now is; And each moment is new. So time, flies on and follows, Always, forever new, And is always new. For neither the river Nor this tide can Can stop their flow. I say: There is nothing In the whole universe, Nothing that persists. For that which once was is now gone. Text is adapted by the composer from Ovid, Metamorphoses, Bk XV:176-198, “Pythagoras’s Teachings: The Eternal Flux.”

        Recording from the Brisbane Chamber Choir at the Adelaide Chamber Choir Festival, October 2023, via The Australian Digital Concert Hall.

         

        Lullaby (Treble)

        #MM2109

        This gentle piece expresses the feelings of Mary as she reflects on the child she has borne. She feels affection for the sweet young babe she holds in her arms. Yet there is also wonderment and awe, as she understands his true nature and grapples with what the future holds for him. These are feelings similar to what any mother would have for her child. A mother’s love is a universal theme. It can be understood by people of all faiths and creeds. Therefore, this piece, while sacred, can be sung in secular contexts as well as in services.

        A version of this piece is also available in SATB voicing here.

        The recording below is by the UQ Chamber Singers, 2022, conducted by Graeme Morton.

        A Red, Red Rose

        #MM2106

        Graeme Morton’s A Red, Red Rose beautifully captures the romance of Scottish poet, Robert Burns’ text of the same title. Heart wrenching harmony and union of voice and strings evoke the poignancy of the text – And I will love thee still my dear, til all the seas gang dry. Til all the seas gang dry my dear, and the rocks melt with the sun; and I will love thee still my dear, while the sands o’ life shall run.

        A stunning piece for SATB voices with viola or violin and an excellent addition to your concert programme.

         

         

        For your convenience, both the viola and violin parts are attached separately below, free of charge.

        A Red Red Rose – Viola

        A Red Red Rose – Violin

        ,

        Lament

        #MM2035

        Lament is a piece for mixed choir and cello. The text comes from the 17th-century oratorio ‘Jephte’ by Giacomo Carissimi. The words are those of anguish, for Jephte promised to sacrifice the first thing he laid eyes upon if he returned victorious from war. He fulfilled this vow, even though this happened to be his only daughter.

         

        The recording is of the Brisbane Chamber Choir, for whom the piece was written. The cellist is Gwyn Roberts.

        Finest Hour

        #MM0505

        Without Churchill’s gifts of oratory, would the Allies have prevailed in World War Two? His speeches resonate these many decades later.  This choral work, Finest hour, takes its music very explicitly from Churchill’s own composition – the melody and rhythm contained within his spoken intonation. The choir simply reproduces this melody and frames it in harmony, enhancing perception of what is already there though perhaps unnoticed. It is hoped that the music also heightens the emotions of this stirring speech.

         

        The conductor listens to a click track through earphones (it’s preferable that these are worn discreetly, and should be either in-ear earbuds or, ideally, bone conduction headphones where available, as these leave the ear free to listen). The work may be performed with video or audio; in both cases, the audio track contains the click track on the left channel and the speech on the right channel. The left channel should be sent only to the conductor’s headphones, and the right channel to front-of-house loudspeakers. It’s possible to perform the piece with a very simple speaker setup, such as using a single speaker placed amongst the singers.

        Losing the Plot (SSA)

        #MM1500

        A collection of four pieces for treble voices and piano. Click the links below to view purchasing information.

        1. Talking to My Shoe

        2. Underpants Anthem

        3. La-La Land

        4. Lost the Plot

         

        Composer Paul Stanhope writes:

        Losing the Plot is a collection of songs for children’s voices and piano with texts by Michael Leunig. They were written as a follow up to my earlier cycle of Leunig pieces called Songs of Innocence and Joy for treble voices and chamber orchestra.

        The first of these pieces, Talking to My Shoe was commissioned and premiered by the Sydney Children’s Choir as part of their 15th anniversary in 2004. The remaining three songs in the cycle were commissioned by the Network of Treble Ensembles (NoTE) which includes Brisbane Biralee Voices, Gondwana Voices,Young Adelaide Voices and Young Voices of Melbourne. All the songs in this set are tinged with an exuberant sense of the absurd, but as usual with Leunig’s texts, there are many layers of meaning and often twists in the tale.

        The songs are written for upper-primary to high-school aged treble voices mostly in unison and two parts. In two songs—Talking to My Shoe and La–La Land—the choir splits into three parts, but only in a couple of short passages. A more difficult version of this piece also exists with the voices divided into three parts.

        Permission should be sought from Penguin Books Australia before re-printing any of the texts.

        The recordings are by the Australian Boys Choir conducted by Noel Ancell.

        Wake Up!

        #MM2610

        Wake Up! is a rhythmic and energetic piece that re-imagines the choir ensemble as a contemporary band. Amongst the global frenzy of contemporary culture, hip-hop and urban music has become the ‘folk music’ that resonates strongly with our current generation. This piece captures the vibrancy of those rhythms and melodies through the imitation of driving hip-hop beats and vociferous rap vocal.

         

        Sing Out!

        #MM1511

        Sing Out! was commissioned for Australian Society of Music Education Conference 2005 as the opening massed work. It is a short, fun, rhythmic piece to be sung ‘with joy’.

        Hombres, Victoria, Victoria (from Three Motets after Victoria)

        #MM2034(c)

        The third of Joseph Twist’s “Victoria Triptch”. Suitable for concert use, and liturgically especially at Christmas.

        The recording (below) is by the Choir of St James Church, King Street, Sydney. A pronunciation guide is also here.

         

        Victory, mankind! Because against all of hell, The crying of a tender child ensures our glory.

        Available in the set of Three Motets after Victoria, found here – not available singly.

        Lamentation of Jeremiah (from Three Motets after Victoria)

        #MM2034b

        The second of Joseph Twist’s “Victoria Triptych” this piece quotes from Victoria’s Lamentation, adding new modern elements clothed in a rich, plaintive harmonic language. Suitable for concert and liturgical use, and making musical references to Victoria’s Lamentations throughout.

        Available in the set of Three Motets after Victoria, linked here – not available singly.

        Versa est in Luctum

        #MM2034a

        Number one of Twist’s “Victoria Triptych”. My harp is tuned for lamentation, and my flute to the voice of those who weep. Spare me, O Lord, for my days are as nothing (trans. Miguel Iglesias)

        Available in the set of Three Motets after Victoria, linked here – not available singly.

        Three Motets After Victoria (Victoria Triptych)

        #MM2034

        This “Victoria Triptych” was written in 2011, the 400th anniversary of the death of the great Spanish polyphonist, Thomas Luis de Victoria. For unaccompanied SATB choir, and with divided parts, these wonderful Latin motets remind us that the great motet tradition is still vibrant and flourishing. The individual titles, recorded by the choir of St James King Street, Sydney, one of three commissioning choirs, are:

        Versa est in Luctum

        Lamentation of Jeremiah

        Hombres, Victoria, Victoria!