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        Genre: Concert Repertoire

        Title Description Composer Voicing

        Crossing The Bar

        #MM 0604

        An evocative setting of Tennyson’s text. Suitable for high school, community and church choirs.

        And Loud We Sing And Long!

        #MM 0605

        This carol for Christmas manages to combine several opposing concepts. It mentions the traditional winter cold of Christmas and the summer heat which is part of the Australian Christmas experience. It also combines “scat” syllables in a style which is definitely Classical. This piece can be sung by any church or college ensemble which sings the standard repertoire of Christmas. Highly recommended!

        Voices Of A Land

        #MM 0801

        An anthology of three songs, Cutty Sark, Midsummer Noon and Drovers. The score includes instructions for “random bush sounds”.

        Voices Of A Land – Cutty Sark

        #MM 0801a

         

        A tale of two ships the Cutty Sark and the Dunbar. The Dunbar was wrecked in the nineteenth century and calls to warn the Cutty Sark of danger “do you hear my faint ahoy?”.

         

         

        Waltzing Matilda

        #MM 0404

        A masterly and unique arrangement of Australia’s favourite song.

        We Welcome Summer

        #MM 0410

        A wonderful piece which welcomes “the glorious blessing of light” asking us to “pour out our darkness into the glorious forgiving light”. Would suit a good college or church choir. It could also be used as an Epiphany anthem with a difference, since Epiphany appears in the middle of summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

        Coraparena

        #MM 0412

        Also from Songs of Passage, “coraparena” means “flat place”. The writing is easy to sing though it contains some chord clusters. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.

        Ceduna

        #MM 0413

        This is the fourth title of Songs of Passage, the work which includes Ngana. “Ceduna” means “waterhole”. The music includes “boxes” of material for singers to work through as well as traditionally scored sections. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.

        Tabulam

        #MM 0414

        Another in the Songs of Passage set, “tabulam” means “my home”. This song captures the energy and life of music-making from the north of Australia where part-singing is joyous, spontaneous and often improvised. The writing is lush, rich and repetitive. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.

        Until I Saw

        #MM 0402

        A slow meditative work. A beautiful imaginative piece that stands among the best.

        South Australia

        #MM 0403

        A robust arrangement which includes two versions of an Australian sea shanty. The composer also sanctions a cappella performances.

        Ngana

        #MM0912

        The treble version of Stephen Leek’s famous work from Songs of Passage. “Ngana” means “shark” and the piece strikingly captures the driving energies, rhythms and vivid colors of the island seascape found around the north-eastern tip of Australia.

        The recording is by Young Voices of Melbourne, directed by Mark O’Leary.

        Ngana

        #MM0405

        Stephen Leek’s famous work from Songs of Passage. “Ngana” means “shark” and the piece strikingly captures the driving energies, rhythms and vivid colors of the island seascape found around the northeastern tip of Australia. Ngana was commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St. Peters Chorale.

        Bullocky-O

        #MM1010

        A rollicking piece for a good high school choir. Bullock teams were an important form of early transport for heavy loads in Australia and each one was driven by a “bullocky” – a pioneer of great character. Requires a skilled pianist.

        Andy’s gone with cattle

        #MM10112

        Combines the traditional music and text of the Australian folk song Andy’s Gone With Cattle with the American folk song He’s Gone Away. Would suit a high school choir.