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        Keywords: unaccompanied

        Title Description Composer Voicing

        Lullaby

        #MM0614

        This gentle piece expresses the the feelings of Mary as she reflects on the child she has borne. She feels affection for the sweet young babe she holds in her arms. Yet there is also wonderment and awe, as she understands his true nature and grapples with what the future holds for him. These are feelings similar to what any mother would have for her child. A mothers love is a universal theme. It can be understood by people of all faiths and creeds. Therefore, this piece, while sacred, can be sung in secular contexts as well as in services.

        On The Night Train

        #MM2032

        Composer Joe Twist writes,

        On The Night Train sets the scene of a train dashing through the Australian bush at dusk, as described by Henry Lawson’s graceful poetry. The emptiness of the Australian outback is represented by long, sustained pitches in the opening and closing sections of the work, above which a simple, folk-like melody is sung. This melody is also used throughout a rhythmic contrasting section where the singers create the impression of a moving train with ‘scat-like’ nonsense syllables and whispered vocal effects.

        Wake Up!

        #MM2610

        Wake Up! is a rhythmic and energetic piece that re-imagines the choir ensemble as a contemporary band. Amongst the global frenzy of contemporary culture, hip-hop and urban music has become the ‘folk music’ that resonates strongly with our current generation. This piece captures the vibrancy of those rhythms and melodies through the imitation of driving hip-hop beats and vociferous rap vocal.

         

        Sing Out!

        #MM1511

        Sing Out! was commissioned for Australian Society of Music Education Conference 2005 as the opening massed work. It is a short, fun, rhythmic piece to be sung ‘with joy’.

        Lamentation of Jeremiah (from Three Motets after Victoria)

        #MM2034b

        The second of Joseph Twist’s “Victoria Triptych” this piece quotes from Victoria’s Lamentation, adding new modern elements clothed in a rich, plaintive harmonic language. Suitable for concert and liturgical use, and making musical references to Victoria’s Lamentations throughout.

        Available in the set of Three Motets after Victoria, linked here – not available singly.

        Versa est in Luctum

        #MM2034a

        Number one of Twist’s “Victoria Triptych”. My harp is tuned for lamentation, and my flute to the voice of those who weep. Spare me, O Lord, for my days are as nothing (trans. Miguel Iglesias)

        Available in the set of Three Motets after Victoria, linked here – not available singly.

        Three Motets After Victoria (Victoria Triptych)

        #MM2034

        This “Victoria Triptych” was written in 2011, the 400th anniversary of the death of the great Spanish polyphonist, Thomas Luis de Victoria. For unaccompanied SATB choir, and with divided parts, these wonderful Latin motets remind us that the great motet tradition is still vibrant and flourishing. The individual titles, recorded by the choir of St James King Street, Sydney, one of three commissioning choirs, are:

        Versa est in Luctum

        Lamentation of Jeremiah

        Hombres, Victoria, Victoria!

        Voice Of The River

        #MM2041

        Orlovich has a keen ear for the way different texts resonate with each other. This piece uses the traditional Latin text Dulcis Jesu Memoria and Victor Carrell’s Voice of the River which draws on a series of images which address “love” as it is found in some of its myriad manifestations. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale and suitable for a good high school or college choir. It could also be used in church situations as an anthem.

        Breakers

        #MM0504

        “Dolphins” are the subject of this highly energetic and rhythmic piece.

        Crossing The Bar

        #MM0604

        An evocative setting of Tennyson’s text. Suitable for high school, community and church choirs.

        Tabulam

        #MM0414

        Another in the Songs of Passage set, “tabulam” means “my home”. This song captures the energy and life of music-making from the north of Australia where part-singing is joyous, spontaneous and often improvised. The writing is lush, rich and repetitive. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.

        We Welcome Summer

        #MM0410

        A wonderful piece which welcomes “the glorious blessing of light” asking us to “pour out our darkness into the glorious forgiving light”. Would suit a good college or church choir. It could also be used as an Epiphany anthem with a difference, since Epiphany appears in the middle of summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

         

        The recording is track number 08, from The Australian Voices’ CD, “The Listening Land”. Conducted by Graeme Morton.

        Coraparena

        #MM0412

        Also from Songs of Passage, “coraparena” means “flat place”. The writing is easy to sing though it contains some chord clusters. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.

        Ceduna

        #MM0413

        This is the fourth title of Songs of Passage, the work which includes Ngana. “Ceduna” means “waterhole”. The music includes “boxes” of material for singers to work through as well as traditionally scored sections. Commissioned by Graeme Morton’s St Peters Chorale.